New PSAs Encourage Others to Share Stories of Addiction and Recovery

~Television Spot Directs Viewers to The Hope Share, an Online Community for People in Recovery and Their Families~

New York, NY, February 25, 2014 – The Partnership at Drugfree.org, a national nonprofit dedicated to finding evidence-based solutions to teen substance abuse, released today new television public service announcement (PSAs) promoting The Hope Share, an online story-sharing portal and community of support for those in recovery and their families.

An estimated 85 million people in the U.S. have been affected by addiction. The Hope Share aims to help break the stigma surrounding addiction and unite those who have been touched by the disease, giving them a place to share stories and, in turn, share hope. Now in its second year, the online community currently consists of thousands of active members.

The spot highlights true stories of people who have faced addiction. Mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers, sons and daughters all speak candidly about their own, or a loved one’s, struggle with this disease, and how their lives have changed since finding recovery. The television spot implores viewers to share their stories with The Partnership at Drugfree.org, because one person’s story of recovery can change someone else’s.

“I think it’s important for people struggling with addiction and their families to share stories of recovery and to help inspire people to get and stay sober,” said director Pamela Hanson. “Having lost my 22-year-old son to addiction four years ago, I wanted to make this campaign to help raise awareness about addiction, and try to help as many people as possible understand that while this is a disease, there is hope.”

“Since its launch, The Hope Share has grown into a vibrant community of people who have courageously shared their personal struggles and triumphs, and candidly shared their paths to recovery in order to help heal and support others,” said Kristi Rowe, Director of Branding & Integrated Marketing at The Partnership at Drugfree.org. “This new PSA is a vivid reminder of the power and self-identify that comes with recovery.”

The ad was directed by Pamela Hanson, and production and editing was done by Consulate. Additional pro-bono partners included J. Walter Thompson for copywriting, graphics provided by Spontaneous and audio record and mix by Gramercy Park Studios.

To view the new television spot, visit The Partnership on YouTube. To see stories on The Hope Share or submit your own, visit drugfree.org/thehopeshare.

5 Responses to New PSAs Encourage Others to Share Stories of Addiction and Recovery

  1. krystal | March 24, 2014 at 1:02 pm

    My name is krystal I am 25 years old, I have been addicted to heroin for 9 years. U know I was one of those people who thought that me shooting heroin would ever take my life until it almost did on 3-7-14. I was at my sisters house and my sister found me laying face down in my own puke in her bathroom, she immediately rushed me to the er (she said I fought her the whole way there)I dont remember. But when I got there I had hardly no heartbeat my respirations were really really slow and hardly no blood pressure. The drug narcan saved my life and so did my sisters. I woke up didnt know where I was and all I seen was my mothers face and I freaked out bc I know she was hurt and scared. She was the only one who could come in my room that I wouldn’t freak out on. When I finally come to it literally scared the carp out of me, that stuff almost cost my kids there mother. U know god gave me a second chance at life and I took an oath to myself and my family that I was done and would never take another drug again. So now I have been totally clean for 18 days and I feel great. Just please take my advice and dont do it its not worth it at all. Its not worth having ur family go threw the pain and u loosing ur life bc of it. Just honestly before u do it, think about it please. It could save ur life.

    • Amanda | March 25, 2014 at 10:34 am

      The worst day sober is so much better than any day spent addicted. I thank God everyday that I’ve too been given a 2nd chance and am now a mother to my children again. I’ve been clean from shooting meth since 8-22-12 and life is better than I could’ve ever imagined. There are days that are tougher than others, yes…especially in the beginning but its a wonderful, wonderful thing that has taken place! Stay strong and keep it up Krystal! People are so incredibly proud and happy for you!

    • Melanie Giancaspro | March 31, 2014 at 4:10 am

      Krystal please keep up the good work. I was shooting heroin for 11 years. I am now clean for three years it is wonderful, I do not even miss it I know those first few months really suck but you will get over it…worse comes to worse go on methadone it is way better than having to go back to dope. I am a counselor now. Going to school for my cadc also helped me to stay clean. I did not do narcotics anonymous but I did use methadone at a clinic to get off. I don’t ever think about it anymore, I don’t miss it. You can do it!!!

  2. miranda | March 29, 2014 at 12:01 pm

    1-24-13 the day i checked into rehab i was 27 and was near death after being addictted to shooting meth. I hit rock bottom lost my 2 kids, my family, friends, my home, everything. My addiction was strong my daughter was born addictted to meth it seemed the hold meth had on me was to strong for me to fight on my own i needed help. I spent 39 days in a rehab called the Hope House. It changed my life i now fight everyday to stay clean and im blessed to say ive been clean for over a year, got my kids had my third child. Have my family and new healty realationships. I love being me today all that ive overcome has made me a stronger person. Anything thats diffucult to do like fighting addiction is worth the fight.

  3. Riley | March 30, 2014 at 4:14 pm

    My name is Riley. I live in a small town in Nevada and literally there are drugs everywhere. We are known as the drug capital. And as meth presented itself I took the opportunity to say yes and try this new drug. I smoked meth everyday for six months. The first time I tried it I loved it and i was hooked. I stole from gas stations, stole from my job, from my family and my best friends family just to get a high. I was in deep and knew there was no way out so why stop right? But then my family started noticing. I was 5’2 and 82 pounds, but when I looked in the mirror I looked good. I could out smoke any drug dealer in town. I would have panic attacks from staying up for weeks on end with no sleep but I didn’t care I had lost all self respect and was hurting everyone that loved me along the way but meth was my number one now nothing and no one else mattered. In April of 2013 I found out I was pregnant. I didn’t know what to do because I wasn’t willing to give up my drug that I loved so much. But I looked in mirror and realized that I was an ugly selfish person and I couldn’t believe what this drug had done to me. When you imagine your life and where you will end up, I never pictured my life like that. So I took a deep breath and flushed it down the toilet. I felt free, I felt scared too but I knew I could over come this nasty thing that had taken over my life. I had my son Janurary 7,2014 and I have never looked back let alone surrounded myself with negative people that influence me in the wrong direction. Sometimes you have to walk away from some of your best friends because their lifestyle is not suitable for you. You have to think about what’s best for you. My son saved my life and I don’t even have words to explain how great full I am for him coming into my life. It truly is a miracle. He is a miracle. (Sober since April 15, 2013)

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