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Making a Difference Through Song: Annual Fundraiser Honors Russell Bietsch; Raises Awareness of Teen Substance Abuse

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Klark Bietch Performs at the Memorial Concert

Klark Bietch Performs at the Memorial Concert

The Bietsch family of Roswell, GA, held their third annual memorial concert, “Sing Russell’s Song,” in honor of their son, Russell Bietsch, who died in an Ecstasy-related death in 2007.  All proceeds from this year’s concert, held on May 15, were generously donated to the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids to assist families who want and need support with drug abuse prevention, intervention, treatment and recovery.


“This was our third year hosting the ‘Sing Russell’s Song’ memorial concert. We always have a great audience and the kids who attend know why they are there. Everyone in the community comes together in a powerful way,” said Irene Richards-Bietsch. “the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids and the wonderful resources they offer are important, and every year we are thankful for these valuable, lifesaving tools for both parents and students.”

Since 2008, the concerts have raised more than $15,000 and helped increase awareness about the risks and dangerous effects of substance abuse and how it devastates families.

“We are grateful for the opportunity to work with the Bietsch family and the wonderful people in Roswell and were inspired to see how a local community united to honor Russell while supporting the work we do for families,” said Steve Pasierb, President and CEO of the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids. “We send our sincere condolences to the Bietsch family, and thank them for their generous support of our organization, helping us to continue to reach countless other families across the nation with programs and resources.”

For more information on planning a fundraiser to help support the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, please visit Grassroots Fundraising.

1 Response to this article

  1. Avatar of Vernon Mackaman
    Vernon Mackaman / October 24, 2010 at 7:25 am

    I am 27 years old and started smoking at the age of 17. I stopped when i was 19 to the age of 20 (roughly 12 months) then i relapsed and didnt quit again until i was 25. I quit for about 10 months the relapsed on day when i was drinking with some old friends i had not seen in a long time. I thought it would be ok to just smoke once since i had gone for so long.

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