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Caffeine isn’t the only problem with sweetened high-alcohol drinks, writes David L. Rosenbloom, who directs Join Together, in a published editorial in The New York Times.

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The director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has outlined a planning process to reorganize the federal government’s substance abuse research agencies — including the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) — into a single entity.

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Phoenix HousePhoenix House Foundation, a large, multi-state addiction treatment provider, has partnered with Vanguard Services Unlimited, a nearly 50-year-old substance abuse treatment provider based in the Washington D.C. area. The new organization will extend both groups’ reach and will be dubbed “Phoenix Houses of the Mid-Atlantic.”

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Ballot measure resultsElection night is over, and most of the results are in: it’s a mixed bag for the alcohol and other drug initiatives on state ballots. California’s efforts to legalize marijuana — a.k.a. Proposition 19 — fell short with 56 percent of voters rejecting the measure. Initiatives related to medical marijuana in South Dakota and Oregon also failed, while Arizona narrowly approved a medical-marijuana measure.

Massachusetts voted to repealed a 6.25 percent alcohol tax, and Washington chose to block at least one measure seeking to privatize liquor distribution. Meanwhile, California approved Prop. 26, possibly negating efforts to require the alcohol industry, among others, to pay for the harm caused by their products.

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personal medical record The North Carolina Sheriff’s Association wants access to information contained in a State prescription database about any person in the state who has a prescription for a narcotic pain medicine. The Association claims if they have this information it will be easier for them to make drug arrests. This is an outrageous and dangerous threat to good medical care and addiction treatment.

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Tobacco signs are more common in less affluent communities — and Latino and African-American populations are particularly affected — the Boston Globe reported August 30.

But all that could change, now that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) can regulate tobacco companies.

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We’ve resumed publishing after a two-week hiatus to migrate our web and email publishing systems. If you have a Join Together email subscription, here’s a couple of things you need to know.

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Women who get pregnant later in life are at higher risk of having children with birth defects in general, and those over age 30 who

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As new laws against labeling cigarettes as “light” and “mild” go into effect, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is enlisting the support of prevention groups and others in getting the word out that there’s no such thing as a “safe” or “safer” cigarette.

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The expanded use of electronic health records — intended to improve and streamline healthcare services — has become a bone of contention in the addiction community, where unique privacy concerns could hamper integration with the rest of healthcare. Squabbles aside, however, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is pressing forward with regulations (and incentives) to promote wider adoption of electronic health records across the healthcare system.

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