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A new government report shows 37 percent of U.S. pedestrians killed in 2011 were drunk, USA Today reports. Thirty-five percent of those killed had blood alcohol levels that were at or above the legal limit for driving.

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In recent years, a growing number of states have passed laws protecting retailers from being liable for harms caused by customers served alcohol illegally, according to a new study.

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Most women who drink before becoming pregnant continue consuming alcohol throughout their pregnancy, Australian researchers have found.

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People who are both smokers and heavy drinkers have a faster decline in brain function, compared with those who don’t smoke and who drink moderately, a new study suggests. Smoking and heavy drinking is associated with a 36 percent quicker decline in cognitive function.

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Women are more likely to describe intoxication with moderate words such as “tipsy” or “buzzed,” while men tend to use harsher words such as “hammered” or “wasted,” according to a new study.

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School anti-alcohol policies are more effective when students think they are being enforced, researchers at the University of Washington have found. Students’ perceptions of the policies’ enforcement are more important than the details of the policies.

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A study of youth exposure to alcohol finds 37 percent of children in one Pennsylvania county had tasted alcohol by age 8, and two-thirds had tried it by the time they were 12.

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As the workday grows ever longer, an increasing number of companies are offering alcohol as an office perk, according to The Wall Street Journal. Employment lawyers say the trend can lead to problems including drunk driving, assault, sexual harassment or rape.

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Disrupting memories of past drinking, by blocking a pathway in the brain linked to learning and memories, may help reduce alcoholic relapse, a study of rats suggests.

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Some men who use the baldness drug finasteride (Propecia) report drinking less alcohol, according to a new study. The researchers say they are not sure why the medication may reduce the urge to drink, but suggest the drug may change the brain’s chemistry.

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