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The Chinese movement exercise known as qigong may help control cocaine craving early in recovery, a new study suggests.

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The shape of cocaine users’ brains may influence whether they become addicted to the drug, British researchers have found. A smaller frontal lobe is associated with a greater risk of cocaine addiction.

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New research suggests people with common genetic mutations have an almost eightfold increased risk of dying from cocaine abuse. The mutations affect the chemical messenger dopamine in the brain.

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A new study suggests combining the anti-seizure drug topiramate with amphetamines may help treat cocaine addiction.

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A new study presented at the American Heart Association annual meeting suggests people who use cocaine may have stiffer arteries, higher blood pressure and thicker heart muscles, all of which can lead to a heart attack.

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A new study on rats suggests the experience of becoming a mother may change a female’s response to cocaine, dampening the drug’s effects.

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A combination of the drugs naltrexone and buprenorphine might be an effective treatment for cocaine addiction, a study in rats suggests.

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Colombia’s cocaine production dropped 25 percent from the previous year, the White House Office on National Drug Control Policy announced Monday. Peru and Bolivia are now the world’s top producers of the drug.

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A new rodent study suggests that a key ingredient in “bath salts” called mephedrone has effects on the brain’s reward circuits that are comparable to similar doses of cocaine. The study offers evidence that mephedrone has the potential for abuse and addiction, the researchers say.

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Addiction experts are looking at exercise as a potential non-drug treatment for various types of substance abuse. One study at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston is examining whether exercise can treat people who are dependent on both cocaine and nicotine.

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