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Occasional marijuana use may change the brain structure in young adults, a new study suggests. Marijuana may cause changes related to motivation, emotion and reward.

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Heavy marijuana use in the teenage years could damage brain structures vital to memory and reasoning, a new study suggests.

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Long-term use of heroin appears to change how genes are activated in the brain, a new study suggests. This leads to changes in brain function, HealthDay reports.

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People who are both smokers and heavy drinkers have a faster decline in brain function, compared with those who don’t smoke and who drink moderately, a new study suggests. Smoking and heavy drinking is associated with a 36 percent quicker decline in cognitive function.

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Disrupting memories of past drinking, by blocking a pathway in the brain linked to learning and memories, may help reduce alcoholic relapse, a study of rats suggests.

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A new animal study suggests a missing brain enzyme increases concentrations of a protein related to opioid addiction, Science Daily reports.

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Low doses of the active ingredient in marijuana appear to stop some forms of brain damage in mice, an Israeli researcher has found.

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Scientists at Johns Hopkins University have identified a compound that stopped mice addicted to cocaine from wanting the drug. The compound has been proven safe for humans and is undergoing further animal testing, in preparation for possible clinical trials for people addicted to cocaine.

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People who drink heavily and smoke may have more signs of early aging of the brain, including problems with memory, quick thinking and problem solving, compared with heavy drinkers who are nonsmokers.

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Exercise may help protect the brains of people who drink heavily, a new study suggests.

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