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Smokers Who Use E-Cigarettes Not More Likely to Quit, Study Suggests

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A study of smokers finds those who also use e-cigarettes are no more likely to quit smoking after a year, compared with smokers who don’t use the devices.

Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, studied 949 smokers, 88 of whom also used e-cigarettes, Reuters reports. Those who used e-cigarettes didn’t smoke fewer regular cigarettes after one year, compared with those not using the devices, the researchers reported in JAMA Internal Medicine.

“Our data add to the current evidence that e-cigarettes may not increase rates of smoking cessation,” the researchers wrote. “Regulations should prohibit advertising claiming or suggesting that e-cigarettes are effective smoking cessation devices until claims are supported by scientific evidence.”

A study published last year by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found one-fifth of U.S. adult smokers have tried e-cigarettes. The percentage of smokers who tried the battery-powered devices jumped to 21 percent in 2011, from about 10 percent the previous year.

1 Response to this article

  1. Fr. Jack Kearney / March 25, 2014 at 1:53 pm

    Ah, my new favorite “study” for my “junk science lectures. As Dr. Carl Phillips pointed out, even Thomas Glynn of the American Cancer Society admits “the most obvious weaknesses with the study: small sample size and paltry information about e-cigarette use (in particular they did not try to distinguish between “tried one puff on an e-cigarette as a lark” or “not trying to quit and just use e-cigarettes in one particular non-smoking venue” from “actively trying to switch to e-cigarettes”, or from everything in between).”
    Dr. Michael Siegel points out: “92% of the e-cigarette users in the study were not trying to quit. We know for a fact that 92% of the e-cigarette users were not making a quit attempt. And yet the study authors interpret the data as if these smokers were trying to quit using e-cigarettes, but failed! This is dishonesty in research.”
    I will match this up against my unofficial study at a drug treatment center in which we are getting a 70% reduction in smoking thanks to electronic cigarettes.

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