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Shrinking Federal Funds for Meth Lab Cleanups Hitting Tennessee Hard

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A major reduction in federal funds to clean up meth labs is having a negative impact in Tennessee, where methamphetamine use has been spiking. From 2007 to 2010, the state saw a 250 percent rise in meth lab incidents, busts and explosions, CBS News reports. Tommy Farmer of the Tennessee Methamphetamine Task Force called meth an epidemic in the state.

According to the CBS report, meth is not difficult to make. The “shake and bake” method uses a soda bottle and meth’s key ingredient, pseudoephedrine, which is found in many cold medicines. Once meth is made, it leaves behind a toxic mess that costs about $2,500 per meth lab to clean up.

Until this year, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) spent as much as $20 million annually to help states clean up meth labs. In 2011, however, the DEA budget for meth lab cleanups has been reduced to $8.3 million, and may be wiped out entirely next year, according to the report.

Since federal funds have been reduced, meth lab seizures have fallen by as much as 50 percent in Tennessee.

3 Responses to this article

  1. John Dieter / June 20, 2011 at 4:26 pm

    TN should restrict the sale of pseudophedrine and stop whining about the federal government. If you don’t want big gov’t quit complaining when you get what you wish for.

  2. steve / June 20, 2011 at 3:46 pm

    Maybe if the DEA didn’t spend millions upon millions arresting and locking up people for cannabis possession, maybe they could take those funds and actually use them appropriately. Its sad when we spend more time arresting and prosecuting people who use a relatively harmeless substance when compared to the absoulte devastation that meth can cause to a person, their family and the society at large. How about the DEA start focusing on hard and dangerous drugs.

  3. Steve / June 20, 2011 at 4:29 pm

    Exactly, how can the White House be so stupid, stupid, stupid… Pitiful!!

    White House Focus on Marijuana in Anti-Drug Efforts Seen as Out of Touch by
    Those on Front Line of Meth War; Meth ‘Is an Epidemic and a Crisis
    Unprecedented,’ says Narcotics Official In Hard-Hit Oregon (Now Tennessee)

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