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High-End Meth Makes its Way to Streets of Tucson, Arizona

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Pure, potent methamphetamine is appearing on the streets of Tucson, courtesy of Mexican drug-trafficking organizations, the Arizona Daily Star reports.

Domestic production of meth was drastically reduced in 2005, when legislation was passed that restricted the availability of meth’s main ingredient, pseudoephedrine, found in cold medicines. Now, Mexican drug manufacturing operations have refined their techniques, making the drug more potent and worrisome to law enforcement officials.

The article notes Tucson is a major distribution hub of this new meth. At least 450 pounds of meth was seized by the Border Patrol’s Tucson Sector this year through May. Local police estimate they may be catching only 10 percent of the drug that is moving through Pima County, where Tucson is located.

Authorities say it is difficult to break up the new meth rings because they only need a small stash and a cellphone to operate. They note a high from meth can last for hours, causing paranoia and hallucinations. Use of the drug sometimes can lead to violent behavior.

2 Responses to this article

  1. Sandra, Vancouver, Canada / August 6, 2011 at 12:11 pm

    Interdiction doesn’t work. When you put pressure on one supplier, another one takes over. Addiction is a disease, treat it like one. End the War on Drugs; we can’t afford it.

  2. Joe / August 5, 2011 at 5:50 pm

    Given the choice of “high end meth” verses the “low end meth” commonly available in the black market which causes many more health issue, the higher grade stuff is actually a bit of a blessing. It offers benefits to both users and non-users alike as it relates to the negative consequences of prohibitionist policies.

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