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Heroin Use Increasing Across Ohio

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Heroin use has increased so much in Ohio that users say it is “falling out of the sky,” according to a new report by state health officials. Children as young as 13 are starting to use the drug, they said.

Heroin’s popularity is increasing because it is seen as less expensive and easier to obtain than prescription opioids, according to the Associated Press. Many heroin users responding to a state survey said increased demand for the drug was due to the reformulation of OxyContin, which makes it more difficult to abuse.

The report, released by the Ohio Department of Alcohol and Drug Addiction Services, said availability of heroin in Cleveland is considered to be at epidemic levels. The survey found an increase in heroin abuse across the state during the previous six months.

The state’s Department of Health reports that heroin-involved deaths increased from 16 percent (233) of all drug overdoses in 2008, to 20 percent (283) in 2009, to a high of 22 percent (338) in 2010.

At the Recovery Center in Lancaster, Ohio, an area considered to be the “hotspot” for heroin use in the state, most of the 360 patients are addicted to painkillers or heroin, according to CEO Trisha Saunders. She told the AP that most patients who are addicted to heroin started with painkillers. “They say, `I never thought I’d switch from taking a pill to putting a needle in my arm,’” Saunders said.

The Department of Justice 2011 National Drug Threat Assessment found increased heroin-related overdoses have been reported in cities in at least 30 states.

The report notes, “New users frequently overdose because they are unfamiliar with their tolerance levels; users resuming heroin use after prolonged absences often restart at their prior dosage level, even though their tolerance may have declined in the interim.”

5 Responses to this article

  1. sue / August 14, 2014 at 10:47 am

    Why nother make rehab cheaper. These young people do have thousands of dollars

  2. Avatar of Donald
    Donald / February 14, 2014 at 6:54 pm

    I’M NOT SURE WHAT’S GOING ON? I think because of the prescription drug problem that reportedly started all of this,I had to suffer months of awful pain from a torn rotator cuff. I believe my doctor was reluctant to prescribe me the pain killers I needed to get thru the healing process. I could not afford to have the surgery due to economic reasons. NOT EVERONE ABUSES PRESCIBED DRUGS! Very bitter patient.

  3. Avatar of Tim
    Tim / November 21, 2013 at 11:38 pm

    People are not going to stop using this drug. Why not make it less dangerous to overdose by educating the public regarding purities and proper dosages? There is no need for cooking it in a spoon then injecting with a used syringe. If this drug was cleaned up and delivered orally more like a pharmaceutical grade drug using a number to measure a known dosage, there would be a lot less overdoses and deaths.

  4. Avatar of Chuck Merritt
    Chuck Merritt / January 25, 2014 at 11:34 pm

    The addict would not use it this way. Please don’t share your opinion if you don’t understand. This epidemic is life or death. thank you for caring but please please don’t speak about things you don’t understand you are doing a disservice to those effected. Recovery is possible and people are quitting use everyday, being told you cannot recover from this affliction is all the excuse some addicts need to give up their fight. There is hope, there is help, and if you are struggling with this yourself or someone you love is I encourage you to seek out others who have recovered from the compultion to use and find out how they did it.

  5. Avatar of Chris
    Chris / March 9, 2014 at 6:07 pm

    I couldn’t agree with you more. There are tons of people who don’t abuse the way drugs are prescribed to them. The ones that do and become addicted have a different path they have to follow in order for them to get the right help. No proper dosages and education of the purities will never happen nor work. Having an addictive personality won’t change the way they are given drugs. Structure and education on abstinence usually starts to help only if they want change.

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