E-Cigarettes Deliver Little or No Nicotine, Study Finds

A small study conducted at Virginia Commonwealth University concluded that e-cigarettes failed to deliver on their promise of providing a dose of vaporized nicotine with every puff, CNN reported Feb. 8.

Sixteen volunteers were given two popular brands of e-cigarettes to use; the tobacco-free devices use a battery to heat a liquid containing nicotine, which users then inhale.

However, “Ten puffs from either of these electronic cigarettes with a 16-mg nicotine cartridge delivered little to no nicotine,” according to the study led by researcher Thomas Eissenberg of the university’s Institute for Drug and Alcohol Studies, who added: “They are as effective at nicotine delivery as puffing on an unlit cigarette.”

The study, funded by the National Cancer Institute, will be published in the British Medical Journal.

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E-Cigarettes Deliver Little or No Nicotine, Study Finds

A small study conducted at Virginia Commonwealth University concluded that e-cigarettes failed to deliver on their promise of providing a dose of vaporized nicotine with every puff, CNN reported Feb. 8.


Sixteen volunteers were given two popular brands of e-cigarettes to use; the tobacco-free devices use a battery to heat a liquid containing nicotine, which users then inhale.


However, “Ten puffs from either of these electronic cigarettes with a 16-mg nicotine cartridge delivered little to no nicotine,” according to the study led by researcher Thomas Eissenberg of the university's Institute for Drug and Alcohol Studies, who added: “They are as effective at nicotine delivery as puffing on an unlit cigarette.”


The study, funded by the National Cancer Institute, will be published in the British Medical Journal.

Leave a Reply

Please read our comment policy and guidelines before you submit a comment. Your email address will not be published. Thank you for visiting Join Together.

Required fields are marked *


*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>