Colo. Senate Panel Votes to Tighten Regulation of Medical Marijuana

The Colorado Senate Health and Human Services Committee voted 6-1 in favor of a bill that would require medical-marijuana patients to have a “bona-fide relationship” with a doctor in order to be able to use the drug for medical reasons, the Colorado Statesman reported Jan. 29.

Doctors would be required to conduct physical exams of medical-marijuana patients and provide followup treatment. Ned Calogne, of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment said that five doctors in the state account for half of all medical-marijuana recommendations, including one doctor who issued 700 recommendations in one month.

The bill, which supporters said would bring needed oversight to the state’s medical-marijuana law, was strongly opposed by medical-marijuana advocates who said the rules would be costly and burdensome to patients, some of whom are indigent or disabled.

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Colo. Senate Panel Votes to Tighten Regulation of Medical Marijuana

The Colorado Senate Health and Human Services Committee voted 6-1 in favor of a bill that would require medical-marijuana patients to have a “bona-fide relationship” with a doctor in order to be able to use the drug for medical reasons, the Colorado Statesman reported Jan. 29.


Doctors would be required to conduct physical exams of medical-marijuana patients and provide followup treatment. Ned Calogne, of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment said that five doctors in the state account for half of all medical-marijuana recommendations, including one doctor who issued 700 recommendations in one month.


The bill, which supporters said would bring needed oversight to the state's medical-marijuana law, was strongly opposed by medical-marijuana advocates who said the rules would be costly and burdensome to patients, some of whom are indigent or disabled.

Leave a Reply

Please read our comment policy and guidelines before you submit a comment. Your email address will not be published. Thank you for visiting Join Together.

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You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>